This it the prepurchase survey that we commissioned before the purchase of Sundowner.  I’ve put it here for those of you that may have never seen a survey.   If you’re curious as to what they look like, perhaps this will give you some insight.  Otherwise its just a terrible mess of terminology that may non-sailors wouldn’t understand.  So feel free to ignore this section.

This document will for the starting basis of the “to-do” list for Sundowner.

Kris Diel did this survey and I want to pass a good word along for him.  I think this report speaks for itself.  His work was professional and very thorough.  I’d highly recommend him if you are looking for a survey.  His website is referenced in this report.

Marine Survey for Condition and Valuation

S/V SUNDOWNER

Sundowner at slip in Slidell for sale

1974  WESTSAIL 32

Kristoffer A. Diel, AMS CMI – Marine Surveyor

www.marinesurveyor.com/diel

22 May 2010

22 May 2010

Ms. ,

Pre Purchase Condition & Valuation Survey

THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the undersigned Marine Surveyor inspected the referenced single screw, diesel powered, fiberglass, cutter rigged sailing vessel from 0700 through 1700 on 11 May 2010, while this vessel was lying afloat in Slip #133, Bonfouca Marina, 33370 Rivet Rd., Slidell, LA 70460. A sea trial was undertaken from 1430-1730 on 21 May 2010. This survey was made at the request of Ms. D. Redwine, and for the account of Ms. D. Redwine, in order to ascertain this vessel’s general condition and valuation to make an informed purchase decision.

Mr. Bill Evans, Broker for Owner

Ms. Danielle Redwine, Buyer

Mr. Tate McDaniel, Buyer

Kristoffer A. Diel, Attending Surveyor

Ownership:   Vessel Name: S/V SUNDOWNER

Owner’s Address:

USCG Official No.: 565392[Exp 4/30/2010] Hull ID No: WSSF02511274

Flag: USA Hailing PortNorfolk, VA

Gross Tonnage: 15 Tons Net Tonnage13 Tons

Documented Length: 32 feet Breadth: 11 feet

Draft: 5 feet Depth: 8.7 feet

Displacement: 19,500 lbs. Build year: 1974

Ballast: 7,000 Lbs. Built at: Wrightsville Beach, NC

Model/Type: Cutter rigged aft cockpit sloop Hull Color: White

Total Horsepower: hp.                                   Estimated Speed: 6.5 knots@2500 RPM

Fuel Capacity: 52 gallons Potable Water Capacity: 80 gal (Reported).

MSD capacityReportedly 18 gallons

Airdraft: Approx.50 feet Intended Service: Recreational Offshore Cruising

Ownership, HIN, and official numbers from USCG Certificate of Documentation}. All specifications above are from reference data not measured during survey.


Contents


Scope of Survey            p.  2                                          Findings & Recommendations    p. 30

Description                   p.  3                                          Valuations                                  p. 36

General Condition          p. 29

Circumstances of Survey

Vessel was initially inspected on the morning of 11 May 2010 while afloat. The vessel was then moved under its’ own power for a haul out inspection at Maritime Systems in Slidell, LA.  Subsequently, the vessel was returned to its slip. On the 21 May 2010 from 1400-1900 an informal underway trial was conducted on the waters of Lake Ponchartrain. The sea trial captain had never been aboard before and was not familiar with the various installed systems.

The owner was not available to answer questions about the electrical system, and as a result several electrical systems and components could not be properly evaluated.

Due to paneling, liner, tanks, and installed equipment, only about 5 percent of the hull interior surface could be observed. The specific materials and lay-up schedule for the fiberglass moldings could not be determined with the non-destructive techniques utilized for inspection. Moisture readings referenced throughout the report were taken with an Electrophysics GRP33 Moisture meter. Ships DC power was utilized to check electrical systems.

The hull exterior wetted surface and underwater machinery and hardware were inspected on 11 May during the haul out.

Locked compartments or otherwise inaccessible areas were not inspected.  This vessel was surveyed without removals of any parts, including fittings, fixed carpet or liner materials, screwed boards or panels, anchors and chain, fixed partitions, instruments, clothing, spare parts and miscellaneous materials in the bilges and lockers, or other fixed or semi-fixed items.

No determination of stability characteristics or inherent structural integrity has been made and no opinion is expressed thereto.  This survey report represents the condition of the vessel on the dates specified above, and is the unbiased opinion of the undersigned, but is not to be considered an inventory or a warranty, either specified or implied.

Intended Users

This survey is prepared for the exclusive use of the client or whose name and address appear on Page 1, and this report is not transferable to any other person or entity. The intended users of this report and appraisal are the client and underwriters financing or insuring this vessel for this client only. This report by itself does not contain all the components necessary for a pre-purchase decision, and other potential buyers are specifically excluded as third party users of this report.

The mandatory standards promulgated by the United States Coast Guard (USCG), under the authority of Title 46 United States Code (USC); Title 33 and Title 46 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), the voluntary standards and recommended practices developed by the American Boat and Yacht Council (ABYC), and the standards of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), have been u

Sundowner's deck

HULL, DECK, & SUPERSTRUCTURE

General:

A cutter rigged sloop originally designed for use in the North Sea. William Atkins converted the original Colin Archer design into a pleasure craft. William Crealock refined the design into the Westsail 32. This factory completed vessel is a proven blue water cruiser with 3 circumnavigations under her belt.

Standard layout with forepeak berth modified with double bunk and storage under and to starboard. Aft of the forepeak berth is a transverse head. The head and sink with storage is to port, shower area and storage to starboard.

Main salon has dinette to port, convertible to double berth. Pull out lower berth to starboard and upper berth outboard, above storage cabinetry. Aft of salon to port is U shaped galley. Gimbaled stove outboard and two sinks in countertop aft. Refrigerator forward. Copious storage throughout. Across from the galley is a large navigation station with set of chart sized drawers.

Perkins M50 marine diesel engine access is by removing several panels comprising the companionway ladder up into aft cockpit; and the cockpit sole is removable.

Hull:

Double-ended, hand-laid GRP construction with an encapsulated classic long keel, and full keel with pintle and gudgeon hung rudder.  Made of layers of woven roving and chopped strand mat, set in polyester resin.

FINDING: Some of the rudder shaft bushings are missing or partially missing.

RECOMMENDATION: During the next haulout, recommend unshipping the rudder and replacing all the bushing rings so as to start out with a new set.

Internal: Hull made of conventional solid hand laid up fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) moldings with gelcoat exterior surfaces. Hull stiffness provided by longitudinal stringers and athwartships ribs and plywood core bulkheads tabbed to hull. Tabbing serviceable where limited observation was possible.

Deep bilge holds tankage, service wiring, and piping.

Chain locker forward, divided into two compartments, drains into main bilge.

FINDING: The starboard chain locker access door top hinge is broken, and the inside of the door is moldy.

RECOMMENDATION: Repair chain locker access doors, and utilizing regular dish soap and water, wash down all surfaces to remove mold. Wear breathing mask.

Exterior: Upper and lower full length wood rubrails are mounted along the port and starboard hull topsides sheer with intermittent pieces of bronze ½ outer trim.

FINDING: The hull topsides external rubrails were generally in poor condition, with a large section amidships on the port side missing altogether.

RECOMMENDATION: Repair port and starboard hull topsides rubrails to match existing.

Hull-deck joint is internal overlap type. The hull topsides extend above the deck by 6-1/2” forming a teak capped gunwale; and the deck is mounted on an inward flange shelf.

Hull is painted white with bulwark painted dark blue; light blue antifouling extends up the hull topsides for a waterline stripe. Minor scratches and chalky. Fair condition.

During haulout, moisture readings were not possible due to bottom paint and short haul out duration. Percussion soundings found no detectible voids or hull lamination disbondment. Fair condition.

FINDING: Noted several hundred 1-2” blisters, which appeared to be limited in depth to the paint coating.

RECOMMENDATION: At the next haulout opportunity strip the paint down to the laminate, prime, then fair, re-prime, and paint with anti-fouling material of choice.

Deck:

Deck is FRP with plywood core (reported). Original teak planking has been removed; deck painted white, with grey anti-skid paint applied in all traffic areas. Sighted repairs to the starboard foredeck where epoxy has been injected into core material. Fair condition.

Hull deck joint has the deck with an internal downward flange attached to the hull topsides, forming a bulwark that is a continuum of the hull topsides.

Cockpit is aft of main cabin superstructure, a FRP well let into main deck, with teak grate sole. Seating around circumference with fitted closed cell cushions.

Large lazaretto hatch aft of cockpit.

Superstructure:

Single low profile unit molded with the deck, the main cabin forward extends to the aft cockpit. No visible signs of cracking or deterioration at the cabin/deck interface. Three large bronze screened ports and two smaller bronze screened ports range down each side of the cabin topsides. Large wood box hatch with Lexan top, forward over forepeak berth, and companionway hatch affords good ventilation. Noted blocked off dorade hole in cabintop, above head to port. Teak handrails on cabin top with canvas covers. Three glass light lenses let into cabin roof top.

FINDING: The companionway starboard hatch slide is loose.

RECOMMENDATION: Refasten the companionway hatch slide, and refinish to match.

FINDING: The spring retainer installed on the foredeck hatch cannot be considered safe as a “hold open” mechanism.

RECOMMENDATION: Install a commercially made hold open bar, or perhaps a swing leg of wood attached to the side of the hatch cover.

Interior:

Varnished teak strip ceilings, paneling, and cabinetry facings. Teak planking sole. Galley has sheet of stainless steel on overhead.

FINDING: Noted past water damage to salon joinerwork forward port side.

RECOMMENDATION: Investigate further and determine if leak is still occurring, trace to source, and repair to best marine practice.

Watertight Integrity:

A single compartment hull apparently divided by non-watertight bulkheads. Anchor locker drains into main bilge.

Hatches, doors, windows and port lights opening to exterior decks are apparently watertight types (ABYC Standard H-3.5.2) except main cabin companionway, which is only weathertight. No evidence of current leaks.

Anchors/Rodes:

Port anchor is 45-lb CQR anchor with reported 300 feet of 3/8” BBB galvanized all chain rode.

FINDING: The all chain rode has begun to corrode.

RECOMMENDATION: Take out chain rode for careful inspection, and perhaps have it re-galvanized.

Starboard anchor is 45-lb CQR anchor with 25 feet of 5/16” galvanized chain and approximately 400 feet [in three sections] of 5/8” nylon 3 strand line rode, with bitter end secured to vessel.

FINDING: The anchor rode screw pin shackles are not properly moused.

RECOMMENDATION: Mousing; the placing of stainless wire in the pin and around the shank of the shackle, will stop the pin unscrewing when the anchor is deployed.

NOTE: Highly recommend obtaining different kind of secondary anchor for pulpit. The size of an anchor is determined by the size of the vessel and the weather conditions. The type of anchor is determined by the composition of the seabed. It is prudent to have a varied selection of anchors aboard.

Port and starboard chrome hawse pipes with caps attached with pieces of small stuff line.

NOTE: Important as the hawse pipes are to watertight integrity, recommend attaching hawse pipe caps with a length of wire.

Sighted Hi Tensile 22# Danforth type anchor lashed to mast pulpit.

Sighted large side opening kellet block in head starboard lower locker.

Anchor Rollers:

Installed in the port and starboard sides of the bow pulpit teak grating.

Only starboard anchor has a chain stopper.

FINDING: There are no proper chain stoppers installed. It is imperative to unload the windlass when the anchor is set, and secure the chain rode in some manner.

RECOMMENDATION: Either install proper chain stoppers on both anchors, or a couple of approaches may be implemented in designing a workable chain stopper system. A length of 5/8″ or ¾” three strand nylon should be bent on the cleat and the ‘S’ hook or similar fitting attached to the chain gripping end. Even better, would be a nylon bridle of  ¾” three strand nylon, made up with eyes in each end for placement on the port and starboard forward cleats, with a chain attachment fitting [a galvanized shackle for galvanized chain] in the middle of the bridle. It should be long enough for the middle of the bridle to reach the waterline.

NOTE: When offshore it is common to unrig the anchors to lessen the weight on the boom, and lessen the pitching motion by shortening the hull moment arm.

Chocks & Cleats

One pair of 12” s/s open base Herreshoff style mooring cleats on port and starboard sides of foredeck, with bronze hawseholes in bulwarks. Aft set of 10” bronze open base Herreshoff style mooring cleats with bronze hawseholes in bulwarks. 6” s/s cleat on boomkin on starboard side.

Various 6” and 8” cleats ranged down port and starboard caprail.

NOTE: Notwithstanding this vessel has successfully circumnavigated three times, it is the opinion of this surveyor that the foredeck mooring cleat backing plates are marginal, especially the starboard side. Recommend a solid s/s plate at least ¼” thick, as large as can be reasonably fitted under the available foredeck space.

Deck Fill Fittings:

Function

Location

Labeled

Comment

MSD waste out

Port foredeck

Yes

Fuel Fill

Port Aft deck

Yes

Check ‘O’ Ring

Fuel Fill

Stbd. Aft deck

Yes

Check ‘O’ Ring

NOTE: The ‘O’ rings on all the fuel deck fill fittings are of unknown age Recommend replacement of the fuel deck fill fitting “O” rings.

Life Raft:

Mounted on cabintop, aft of mast is a life raft valise,

Mooring Lines:

Sighted a combination of 5/8” white three strand nylon mooring lines. Fair condition.

More than adequate for the conditions normally encountered in the slip. Sighted various lines in lazaretto.

Rails & Lifelines:

Pulpit railing is 1” welded s/s.

Upper and lower lifelines are bare 5/16” 1 x 19 s/s run down port and starboard main deck. Mounted on 1” s/s stanchions through bolted to gunwale. Lifeline entry gates aft of amidships port and starboard. Good condition.

Outboard of both sides of the mast are mast pulpit of 1” s/s tubing with wood pinrail and 4 wood belaying pins.

Reboarding:

Sighted single folding step on starboard aft quarter of hull topsides.

NOTE: While the folding step on the aft hull topsides is a workable solution to reboarding, it is not feasible in anything but calm and flat conditions. Recommend obtaining aboard a ladder and installing mounts amidships.

Pulpit & Pushpit

Pulpit consists of teak grating anchor platform with two built in anchor rollers, all mounted on the 4”x 4”wood bowsprit. [Reportedly replaced in 1990 with Sampson post]. Pulpit handrail of welded upper and lower course of 1” stainless steel. Navigation lamps mounted on upper handrail.

Anchor platform secured to bowsprit stainless crans irons, with doubled bobstays secured to bow eye fittings; and doubled port and starboard whisker stays, mounted from stainless steel crans irons, and secured to port and starboard hull topsides below bulwark.

Boomkin provides after stay securing point and provides a platform for various s/s supports for wind generator, safety railing, antennas, and Monitor wind vane. Through bolted to aft deck and supported by doubled whisker stays.

Pushpit safety railing is 7/8” s/s tubing.

See STANDING RIGGING section.

Sampson Post

Wood double Sampson post.

FINDING: The seal between the Sampson post and the deck is not tight, and water has penetrated the deck. Resultant rot has occurred in the ½” plywood underlayment (in the overhead of the chain locker.

RECOMMENDATION: First, insert caulk where the Sampson posts penetrate the deck. Inspect the area further, and determine the extent of deterioration. One method of repair might be injection of a penetrating epoxy. Otherwise, have a qualified marine repair technician suggest other methods of repair.

Windlass:

Manual Simpson Lawrence SEATIGER 555 manual horizontal capstan with external deck mounted chrome hawse pipes each side, to anchor locker. Chain gypsy to starboard rode windlass to port.

FINDING: The windlass starboard aft hold down bolt top nut is heavily corroded. There is no record aboard indicating when the last time the windlass bolts were drawn for inspection.

RECOMMENDATION: Draw all the windlass bolts for inspection and replace components as necessary prior to re-installing with proper bedding and sealants.

NOTE: Highly recommend overhauling the anchor windlass.

Wind Vane Autopilot:

MONITOR™ stainless steel self steering gear mounted on transom. Did not test. Serial # 3970-0495

Installed 1995.  Did not test. Appears to be operable, and the various components operated freely.

NOTE: Obtain a repair kit from the manufacturer. It appears that the bronze gear may be worn, and the plastic bushing on the upper end is definitely degraded from UV exposure.

Other:

Wood pin rails and belaying pins mounted port and starboard between the main shrouds.

FINDING: The starboard pinrail between the main shrouds is split longitudinally.

RECOMMENDATION: Replacement of the starboard shroud pinrail is the only option.

FINDING: The port and starboard shroud mounted pin rails were affixed utilizing hose clamps. The tails of these clamps are a personnel safety hazard.

RECOMMENDATION: Find another method to affix the main mast shroud pin rails without utilizing pipe clamps.

10” x 3” deck prism mounted on port and starboard sides of cabin top.

4” round deck prism mounted on port forward portion of main cabin top (over head), and another mounted on port topsides of cockpit.

Two 8” x 24” TAYLORMADE™ Blue inflatable boat fenders, with white canvas covers.

Three 8” x 24” TAYLORMADE™ White inflatable fenders, two of them with white canvas covers.

FINDING: Noted that the fenders were hung from the safety lines. This will soon compromise the stanchions and cause water leaks into the deck substrate, as well as prematurely wearing out the safety lines.

RECOMMENDATION: Only attach the inflatable fenders to the bases of a stanchion or other strong point.


Propulsion Systems

Masts & Spars: Single spreader anodized aluminum main mast, cutter rigged. Mounted in deck stepped tabernacle.Aluminum boom with external rigging. Sheet controls lead to multi block swivel from aft end of boom. The boom has once been damaged and repaired by installing stiffeners down both sides. Appears straight and serviceable. Three turning blocks on starboard side of boom for reefing control lines.

FINDING: The boom mounted middle reef line turning block is broken.

RECOMMENDATION: Replace The boom mounted middle reef line turning block.

 

Boom crutch across aft portion of cockpit. Stainless steel poles with three notch transverse wood section.

Deck stepped main mast with compression post resting on support pillow atop keel. Compression post under sole support in poor condition.

FINDING: The compression post is resting upon a collection of various blocks of undetermined material. Does not appear serviceable over the long term.

RECOMMENDATION: When the mast is next removed for service, include replacing the compression post base with a single block and a minimum of wedges.

 

FINDING: The upper main mast spreaders do not have the correct upward tilt angle.

RECOMMENDATION: Have a competent rigger properly orient the main mast upper spreaders.

 

Inner staysail clubfoot boom is mounted on foredeck pedestal. Staysail traveler on cabintop enables ease of tacking.

Standing Rigging: The 5/16”- 1 x s/s wire rigging throughout. Rigging terminals of STAYLOC type, with bronze body turnbuckles on the lower ends, throughout. 

FINDING: Many of the turnbuckle rigging screws are secured with split cotter pins. These are a danger to crew and running rigging.

RECOMMENDATION: Replace all split cotter pins with split ring fasteners.

 

Port and starboard 1-1/4” bronzeGenoatracks [Approx 8 feet] are mounted on the gunwale wood cap rails on the middle to after portion of the vessel. Each side has two roller cars and one hold down eye.

The doubled s/s chainplates are installed outboard of the gunwale.

FINDING: The chainplates show evidence of corrosion staining at the lower ends. This may indicate deterioration of the fasteners.

RECOMMENDATION: Pull each and every chainplate fastener for close inspection. If any doubt exists replace with like kind and quality.

 

FINDING: The main mast aft shroud chainplates have an unfair lead.

RECOMMENDATION: Obtain the services of a competent marine rigger and follow the guidance given to lessen the deleterious effects of the unfair chainplate leads.

 

NOTE: There are no records sighted to show that the chainplates have been pulled and inspected along with their fasteners. It is not beyond belief that they are original. Prior to going offshore, strongly recommend pulling two representative chainplates from each side for inspection, and if any deterioration is found pull all the others immediately.

 

FINDING: The standing rigging is not correctly tuned, and the spreaders are not correctly oriented (too low).

RECOMMENDATION: Have a competent rigger service the entire rigging system.

 

The bowsprit is supported by single whisker stays of ¼” 1 x 19 s/s wire; and doubled bobstays that are of 3/8” 1 x 19 s/s wire with STAYLOCK type fittings. Check the lower bobstay frequently for corrosion, as it is holding 10,000# of tension.

FINDING: Sighted wasted zinc anode at base of lower bobstay fitting. The STAYLOCK fitting is also corroded. The upper turnbuckle threaded ‘T’ fittings on both upper and lower bobstay have corrosion and cracks.

RECOMMENDATION: Replace bobstay anode with like kind and quality. Replace the lower bobstay STAYLOK fitting. Replace with new, the  upper turnbuckle threaded ‘T’ fittings on both upper and lower bobstay

 

FINDING: Sighted crack in port whisker stay front turnbuckle.

RECOMMENDATION: Carefully inspect the whole system and replace any suspect components.

 

The wood boomkin is bolted to the deck and is supported by doubled 5/16” 1 x 19 s/s wire.

FINDING: There is no available record of how old is the rigging system. In the tropics 10 years is the generally accepted life span.

RECOMMENDATION: Have a rigging specialist inspect the entire system and suggest and overhaul protocol. This is critical prior to venturing offshore.

 

  NOTE: Considering the whole rigging system depends upon the boomkin; recommend DISMANTLING all the fittings secured to the crans irons. Inspect for fastener hole elongation, “T” fitting deformation or cracking, or any corrosion, and replace as necessary. It would also be prudent to draw the fasteners securing the boomkin to the hull, and inspect for corrosion.
Running Rigging: External halyards on main mast. Fair condition.Sail track in good condition. Noted storm sail track, offset to starboard. Good condition.

Boom topping lift, with wire upper end and double block adjusting line low. Fair condition.

Port and starboard 7 x 19 wire running backstays. Fair condition.

Halyards of ½” braided nylon- white w/ colored flecks. Poor condition.

HARKEN mainsheet traveler on deck aft of boom crutch. Good condition.

Staysail traveler forward of main mast. Fair condition.

FINDING: The Staysail traveler car needs attention. It did not roll smoothly during tacking evolutions.

RECOMMENDATION: Remove the staysail traveler car and inspect the condition of the car and roller wheels. Repair or replace as necessary.

Sails: IAN SHORT (Australia) Mainsail, white Dacron with three lines of reef points. Reportedly new in 1997. In Good condition.Double reef point staysail and Yankee reportedly new 1998. Both by ROLLY TASKER,Thailand. Both in good condition.

One small (approx 50s.f.) and one large storm jib (approx 90 s.f.). Sighted in bag only.

Mainand both foresails have blue Sunbrella covers. In good condition.

Winches: Main mast winches: Two BARLOW #16 single speed and One LEWMAR #8 single speed. Serviceable.One BARLOW #13 on both port and starboard sides of main boom. Fair condition.

Cockpit: Two BARLOW #20 single speed (main sheet winches on pedestal attached to gunwale), one BARLOW #16 single speed (port aft), and one BARLOW #15 single speed. Fair condition.

NOTE: Recommend overhaul and re-lubrication of all winches, and schedule annually.

Spare parts available at www.arco-winches.com.

 

 

Mechanical Propulsion System

Prima Perkins M50 diesel engine

Engineroom: Engineroom located amidships under center cockpit. Cockpit floor is removable. Regular access is by removing companionway ladder.Fuel tanks aft and outboard, P&S.

Engine starting battery to starboard.

Main propulsion Engine: PERKINS M-50 4 cylinder naturally aspirated marine diesel engine. Installed 1992. Raw water cooled via heat exchanger. Anti-freeze level normal. Oil level normal. Morse type combination gearshift/throttle control.Serial No. BA-30146U608055V

Flex type rubber engine mounts on longitudinal stringers.

FINDING: By appearance, the rubber engine mounts may be due for renewal. Also, when the engine was running in neutral, there was an abnormal amount of vibration.

RECOMMENDATION: Have a qualified engine mechanic carefully inspect the engine mounts for serviceability.

 

Hour meter in cockpit instrument cluster reads 2254.83, but was not operating during the sea trial. Second engine hour gauge in main electrical panel reads 2946.12

Alarms: FINDING: No audible alarm indicating low engine oil pressure or high oil temperature.RECOMMENDATION: Install an audible alarm indicating low engine oil pressure or high oil temperature.
Cooling System: Raw water-cooling with engine mounted closed circuit heat exchanger. Cooling water raw water intake at seacock under engine to port w/PERKO™ style bronze body & glass, raw water strainer, engine mounted pump, anti-siphon loop, and discharge to wet exhaust.      Reinforced rubber hoses in fair condition but all clamps are in need of inspection, and many need replacement.FINDING: Antifreeze composition not correct.

RECOMMENDATION: Obtain correct antifreeze composition from engine manufacturers’ manual, and bring cooling system into compliance.

 

FINDING: The antifreeze overflow bottle is simply an old plastic bottle. As well, it is not properly secured from misadventure, and should be installed on the same level as the main cooling water reservoir on the engine.

RECOMMENDATION: Investigate the cooling water overflow container assembly and bring into conformance with proper marine standards.

 

Engine mounted cooling water pump. Belt in good condition. Pump looks new.

FINDING: Main engine raw water suction seacock valve not easily operable.

RECOMMENDATION: At the earliest opportunity overhaul main engine cooling water suction seacock.

 

NOTE: It would be prudent to check the main engine heat exchanger pencil zinc anode as well as any others in the main engine cooling water system. Check Perkins manual for location and service interval.

FINDING: Many of the piping clamps on the overboard through hull fittings are beginning to show signs of corrosion.

RECOMMENDATION: Recommend inspecting EACH piping clamp by REMOVING the clamp, inspecting the gear and strap for corrosion, and replace if any corrosion is found.

Transmission: HURTHModel# 125-2.1R reportedly new in 2003.    HBW 12.5-2.0Ratios: A-2.14   B-1.95

Fluid level normal on dipstick.

FINDING: Transmission fluid very dark.

RECOMMENDATION: Recommend changing transmission fluids. Also check any pencil zinc anodes at the same time.

 

Engine mounted external raw water heat exchanger cooling system.

1” stainless steel propeller shaft with shaft saver installed. Bronze hex nut type stuffing box is double clamped and appears serviceable.

FINDING: The clamps on the shaft log are showing signs of corrosion.

RECOMMENDATION: replace all the clamps on the shaft log.

 

NOTE: During the next haulout, recommend replacing the packing in the stuffing box. Make sure there is extra stored aboard.

Exhaust System: Water injection cooling type with rubber piping and waterlift muffler.  All connections are double clamped.NOTE: Did not sight any method of draining any water from the main engine VETUS waterlift muffler. ABYC P- 1.7.2.4.3 The chamber shall be fitted with an accessible drain at the low point of the chamber. Recommend installing a drain fitting to the low point of the waterlift muffler.

FINDING: There were several main engine exhaust cooling water system piping hose clamps that were corroding and need replacement. Also there was a section of exhaust piping that should have some heat protection wrapping installed so no one gets burned.

RECOMMENDATION: Replace all the main engine exhaust cooling water system piping clamps.  Wrap all exposed metal portions of the exhaust system riser.

 

NOTE:All pipe/hose clamps should be inspected annually by completely unscrewing the clamps and removing the clamp so that you can inspect the area under the body of the screw casing. Recommend a program of replacing all the hose clamps whose strap has only indented rather than cut slots. This style is far superior for marine applications.

 

NOTE: Water injected exhaust cooling systems are one of the primary failure points for diesel engines. Recommend immediately removing and inspecting the exhaust injection elbow and examining the interior condition. This should also be done on an annual basis.

 

NOTE:  The most effective protection against an engine-overheating incident is an exhaust temperature monitor. This surveyor highly recommends installing one on main engine exhaust. It is a lot cheaper than a new engine.

ABYC P- 1.7.1.4 An indicator shall be provided at all helm positions to indicate loss of exhaust system cooling water supply.

 

 
  NOTE- Always use clamps that are marked as 316 stainless, and always get the ones without the cutouts for the worm gear.  The clamp bands should be solid with depressions in the clamps for engaging the gear. In situations where 2 clamps are used, the worm gears should be located on opposite sides of the hose.

 

NOTE- Perform periodic disassembly and internal inspection of through-hull fittings and valves each time the vessel is hauled.  Recommend this inspection include a static test of each through-hull fitting to determine degree of deterioration /degradation for both metal and composite fittings.NOTE- Where installation of double hose clamps are recommended throughout this report, it is understood that double clamps should only be installed where there is sufficient length of barb/nipple available and hose end overlap to allow it.  No clamp should be installed closer than ¼” to the end of the hose and must fully engage the barb or fitting. In such cases, replace the fitting with one having a longer barb/nipple to facilitate installation of double clamps (preferred) or install a single clamp of the appropriate size.  Clamps should be separated by at least ¼” (½”) if possible) with screws located on opposite sides of the hose.For a clamp to perform at its optimal level, the clamp should be installed at the manufacturer’s recommended installation torque. Insufficient clamping force allows fluid to seep in between the joint and the hose I.D. increasing the risk of blow-off, while over tightening clamps can cause damage to the hose and/or clamp itself.

Fuel System, Tanks & Piping: Two diesel fuel tanks installed aft and outboard, P&S.Starboard tank is aluminum approximately [40 gallons], and port tank is rubber bladder [12gallons].

Port and starboard deck fuel fittings, properly marked for diesel.

Raycor primary, and Perkins secondary fuel filters.

Type A1 fuel hoses throughout. Hoses in good condition.

FINDING: The hose clamps on the port fuel tank hose are corroded and need to be replaced. There are also several other fuel hose clamps that need replacement.

RECOMMENDATION: Check all hoses and clamps in the fuel system and replace any that are not like new.

 

NOTE: Aluminum fuel tanks usually last about 10 years before corrosion often eats a hole in the welded seams. Recommend having a pressure test conducted on the aluminum tank as soon as possible. Regarding the port side rubber fuel tank; recommend removing and inspecting for wear spots and condition of the fill, feed, and vent fittings.

Sighted engine mounted manual oil change pump.

Sighted 12VDC fuel transfer pump. Did not test for operation.

Lubrication System: Internal engine mounted oil pump. Oil appears to be in need of changing.NOTE: Recommend the installation of an oil pressure gauge and an alternator output ammeter in or near the engine room. This enables someone working on the engine to monitor the oil pressure and alternator output, and also serves as a check against the remote reading gauges at the helm.
Controls: Mechanical type with single lever for throttle and gearshift, mounted on port side of cockpit topside.OEM control panel with key and start switch, tachometer, warning lights, and water temperature gauge mounted on forward cockpit well topsides.
Shaft/Propeller: 1” dia. s/s shaft with bronze nut gland seal. Coupler in good condition.Fitted with 16” dia. x 12” pitch RH bronze 3-blade bronze propeller. In good condition.
Ventilation: Natural ventilation.

 

Steering System

Type:

Tiller. Serviceable.

Rudders:

Pintle and gudgeon hung FRP over foam. In good condition.

FINDING: The line preventer under the rudder (attached to the aft end of the keel) is loose.

RECOMMENDATION: Tighten up the line preventer under the rudder at the next haulout opportunity.

Emergency Steering:

NOTE: – Recommend practicing the fitting and practice utilization of an emergency steering system PRIOR to an emergency incident.

Electrical Systems

DC SYSTEMS

Batteries:

One deep cycle 12-volt, lead-acid type batteries, in a box in starboard forward corner of engineroom. One 80 AH for engine starting. DEAD.

Two deep cycle 12-volt, lead-acid type batteries, in a box in aft end of engineroom. House bank. Poor condition.

Three 12-volt, Group 31 – M242D7 lead-acid type batteries in boxes in the lazaretto.

Battery Installation:

FINDING: The battery installations fail to meet any of the minimum requirements of ABYC E-10.7. Ungrounded terminals not protected by rubber boots. Corrosion on battery leads. Battery leads without proper fusing. Loose terminal wing nuts, loose batteries, etc. AND, the starting battery was found dead, and the house batteries were not in much better condition.

RECOMMENDATION: Have an ABYC qualified marine electrician inspect and upgrade the entire 12VDC battery installation.

Battery Switches:

PERKO 4-position rotary switch located on engineroom bulkhead for DC circuit.

Battery Charging:

Engine mounted BALMAR 90AMP 12VDC alternator.

Wind generator. (Ibid.) Solar panels (Ibid)

Panels/Meters:

Meters and over current breaker switches at main electrical panel on saloon aft bulkhead. Some fuse boxes mounted on engineroom access opening bulkhead.

Solar Panels:

Two 55 AMP 12VDC 18” x 42” SOLAREX Mega Module solar panels.

Mounted on cabintop, aft of life raft valise, on a frame attached to the handrails. Instruments indicate charging.

Serial No (aft panel) 234210   Serial No (fwd panel) 2342170

ASC Solar Panel Charge controller/regulator mounted under companionway ladder.

Two 55 AMP 12VDC 18” x 42” SOLAREX Mega Module solar panels.

Individual panel folds down, hung on port and starboard railings, outboard of the cockpit.

FINDING: At time of survey, installed instruments indicated side mounted solar panels were not operable.

RECOMMENDATION: Have a qualified marine electrician service the outboard solar panels and determine their condition. Repair as necessary.

Wiring:

FINDING: The electrical system appears to be generally operable, but does not conform to any normal installation standards. Open faced terminal blocks, loose wiring, wire nuts, no labeling, and no grommets where wiring passes through bulkheads, minimal strapping, etc.

RECOMMENDATION: Have an ABYC qualified marine electrician conduct a thorough survey of the electrical system, and recommend repairs, upgrades, and improvements.

Wind Generator:

12VDC  AIR MARINE™ Model – 403 wind generator mounted on s/s tubing on boomkin, starboard side.

FINDING: During survey and sea trial could not find any indication of output by the wind generator. Wind conditions were very light.

RECOMMENDATION: Have a qualified marine electrician conduct appropriate tests to determine the condition of the wind generator output parameters.

NOTE: The wind generator body paint is in very poor condition. It will last longer if it is properly prepped, primed, and painted.

Sacrificial Anodes:

FINDING: The zinc anode normally installed on the propeller shaft was missing.

RECOMMENDATION: As soon as is possible, install a zinc collar anode around the propeller shaft.

NOTE: It is a good idea to obtain a second shaft anode and install it on the shaft INSIDE the hull. This not only a readily available spare, but will also prevent the shaft from inadvertently backing out in case of a coupling failure.

FINDING: The anode on the lower bobstay is heavily wasted. Also there is corrosion on the wire end fitting.

RECOMMENDATION: Replace the entire lower bobstay fitting and the zinc anode on lower bobstay as soon as possible.

Lightning Protection:

No lightning grounding system installed.

Note: Few boats are currently wired for lightning protection by the manufacturers.  There is no known way to ensure complete protection for personnel and equipment from a lightning strike.  However, we suggest that any owner review the information at <http://www.thomson.ece.ufl.edu/lightning/>, <http://www.marinelightning.com/> and ABYC TE-4.  We believe that, at the very least, there should be at least adequate electrical conductors (#4AWG) from the base of the mast and the chainplates to a grounding plate or strip on the bottom of the boat.

Grey Water:

Galley and head sinks plumbed directly overboard. Shower drains into bilge sump.

Marine Sanitation:

In both fore and aft head:

Manual LEVAC™ ZENITH toilet, TYPE III MSD. Henderson MK5 bilge pump with Y-valve to overboard discharge. Operated.

ITT JABSCO 12VDC Macerator Model 18590-0000 15Amp. Did not test.

Apparently meets USCG requirements (33CFR159) if seacocks are locked in closed position while within 3 miles offshore.

FINDING: The MSD “Y” valve is stuck in the ‘overboard’ position. This would garner a hefty fine upon the occasion of a compliance boarding.

RECOMMENDATION: Repair or replace MSD “Y” valve prior to getting underway.

Like new (unused) – 18 gallon polypropylene MSD waste holding tank under forepeak berth.

Pump out deck fitting on port main deck, properly marked.

Two approximately 40 gallon aluminum tanks located in bilge, below salon sole. Braided ½” clear plastic hose piping. Fill fittings on tank top.

SHURFLO™ 12VDC 45 psi pump 2.8GPM @ 45GPM (operates), mounted port side of main engine. Model  2088-423-344

Whale IV TIP-TOE Foot pump at galley. Did not operate.

FINDING: The galley foot pump did not operate.

RECOMMENDATION: Investigate further and repair or replace as necessary.

Refrigeration:

WAECO Adler Barbor refrigeration. Reefer box under forward counter of galley. Installed Aug. 2002.

Raw water seacock outboard to starboard of engine. Perko style water filter (needs cleaning) thence to SHURFLOW 12VDC pump, mounted port aft of main engine.

According to broker information, the refrigeration system was not operational.

Electronics/Navigation

VHF:

STANDARD HORIZON™ ECLIPSE GX-1240 mounted above navigation station with masthead mounted antenna (operated).

Radio call sign not posted.

VHF Ships Radio License

FINDING: There is no current Ship Radio License posted. While not necessary for VHF use while inland voyaging, having a SSB radio aboard does require obtaining a ship and operators license.

RECOMMENDATION: Apply to the FCC for a Ship and Radio Operator License.

GPS:

FURUNO Model GP-30 Navigator GPS unit at navigation station. Powered up. Antenna on pole mounted on boomkin.

TRIMBLE Transpac GPS unit mounted at navigation station.

NORTHSTAR 951X GPS Chart plotter. Could not power up. DID NOT TEST.

Fathometer:

AUTOHELM ™ ST-50 (operated).

Wind Speed/Direction:

Masthead mounted WINDEX apparent wind indicator.

Autopilot:

MONITOR wind vane.

Compass:

Two 5” RITCHIE™ BN202 vertical style compasses mounted in aft cabin bulkhead, one each side of companionway.

FINDING: No record of the last time the pair of cockpit mounted compasses were swung. No deviation table available.

RECOMMENDATION: Have a competent mariner swing the compasses and develop a deviation table. This needs to be updated at least annually, or any time major work is conducted aboard.

SSB Radio:

ICOM 702 Mounted in aft cabinet of navigation station. Powered up.

ICOM 1302 AT-130 Automatic tuner mounted in lazaretto, starboard side.

Backstay fitted with HF antenna isolators.

FINDING: SSB Radio not tested for operational parameters. No ships or operators licenses posted aboard.

RECOMMENDATION: Have a qualified licensed radio technician perform the required tests prior to use. Obtain the required operating licenses.

Safety Equipment

THROUGH HULL FITTINGS BELOW THE WATERLINE

50% of boats sink at the dock due to failed underwater fittings. [BoatUS] Location of thru holes in Sundowners

 
   

Location

Use

Type

Material

Condition

Operable

1

DynaPlate Ground plate

Fitting

Bronze

—–

2

Head sink drain

Seacock

Bronze

fair

open

3

MSD overboard

Seacock

Bronze

fair

open

4

Head suction

Seacock

Bronze

fair

open

5

Galley sink drain

Seacock

Bronze

fair

open

6

Cockpit drain

Seacock

Bronze

poor

open

7

Engine suction

Seacock

Bronze

fair

open

8

Ground plate

Seacock

Bronze

—–

9

Cockpit drain

Seacock

Bronze

fair

open

10

Reefer suction

Seacock

Bronze

poor

open

11

Shaft log

Stuffing box

Bronze

fair

—–

Through Hull Fittings:

FINDING: Port side aft, near the refrigerator raw water through hull fitting there are two holes in the hull filled with a RULE 5200 type material. This cannot be considered a seaworthy repair.

RECOMMENDATION: During hull paint stripping, and overhaul of seacocks, recommend proper repairs be conducted to the FRP hull structure.

FINDING: The port cockpit drain hose has only one clamp on the upper end of the hose.

RECOMMENDATION: After determining if a second clamp could correctly fit on the fitting, install one there if possible to do so.

FINDING: None of the seacocks have been operated for over two years. Both the head sink drain and the engine suction seacocks were so stiff as to be considered inoperable.

RECOMMENDATION: Overhaul ALL seacocks at the next haulout, by completely removing them, inspecting for corrosion, and lubricating all moveable parts.

FINDING: Main engine raw water suction seacock valve was not operable.

RECOMMENDATION: Immediately service the main engine raw cooling water seacock.

FINDING: Many of the piping clamps on the overboard through hull fittings are beginning to show signs of corrosion.

RECOMMENDATION: Recommend inspecting EACH piping clamp by REMOVING the clamp, inspecting the gear and strap for corrosion, and replace if any corrosion is found.

NOTE: Highly recommend obtaining wood tapered damage control plugs and fasten them to the base of each seacock. There will not be time to look for them if there is a need.

High Water Alarm:

Did not sight a high water alarm.

NOTE: Highly recommend installing a loud water alarm either on a secondary pump or stand-alone. It is also a good idea to put a low level alarm on all bilge pumps so everyone is aware when the bilge pumps are cycling on and off.

Bilge Pumps:

Sighted two 12VDC bilge pumps in the bilge sump forward of the engine. Access through a deck hatch under companionway ladder.

RULE™ 1200 12-volt electric, centrifugal type 1-1/8”dia. discharge with RULE™ pivot arm float switch. Operated by switch on main panel board.

Unknown MFG – 12-volt electric, centrifugal type 1-1/8”dia. discharge with RULE™ pivot arm float switch. DID NOT TEST.

FINDING: RULE control panel for bilge pump, located at front side of navigation station did not operate. Also found a 20AMP fuse installed. This is a classic way to start a fire.

RECOMMENDATION: Inspect bilge pump system (aft most pump in bilge sump) and determine the problem. Repair or replace as necessary. ENSURE the correctly sized fuse is installed.

HENDERSON manual, diaphragm type with 1-1/2”dia. Discharge. DID NOT TEST. Mounted in engineroom, operated from salon.

HENDERSON manual, diaphragm type with 1-1/2”dia. Discharge. DID NOT TEST. Mounted in engineroom, operated from cockpit.

NOTE: Recommend placing suction end of manual bilge pump in 5 gallon bucket and test for operation, prior to next getting underway.

CO Monitor-Alarms:

FINDING: Did not sight a CO detector aboard.

RECOMMENDATION: Even though not a legal requirement a prudent sailor would install a CO detector aboard.

Distress Signals. :

FINDING: Did not sight any USCG required emergency signaling devices.

RECOMMENDATION: Obtain aboard a current set of USCG approved signaling flares.

Life Preservers (PFDs):

Three Type-1 wearable life jackets in satisfactory condition.

NOTE: Prior to going more than 20 miles offshore, recommend obtaining a TYPE I that will properly fit each crewmember as well as a safety harness. For inland use, recommend an inflatable type PFD. It is also a good idea to install flat webbing jacklines fore and aft.

Sighted horseshoe flotation device, covered in blue canvas, mounted in s/s carrier on starboard aft handrail.

Sound Signals:

FINDING: Did not sight a bell.

RECOMMENDATION: Obtain a bell with a mouth opening of 200mm (over 8”). Also, it would be a prudent idea to install a bell mount on the forward portion of the vessel (or on the mast).

Navigation Lights:

R/G sidelights operated. Stern Light operated.  Anchor Light operated. Spreader lamps and foredeck lamp operated. Tri-color masthead fixture operated.

FINDING: Steaming (Bow) Light did not operate.

RECOMMENDATION: Check the steaming lamp bulb and replace, or find wiring fault and repair to operational status.

NOTE: Did not sight any spare navigation lamp bulbs aboard. Ensure there are adequate spares aboard prior to overnight voyaging.

Smoke-Fire Alarms:

Sighted a KIDDE smoke alarm unit mounted above the navigation station.          Tested OK.

NOTE: The smoke detector battery is of unknown age. The unit should be tested monthly on a regular schedule, and the date of the latest battery installation should be noted on the outside of the unit as well as in the ships log. It would also be prudent to install another unit in the forepeak stateroom.

Fire Fighting:

One Fixed automatic SEAFIRE™ Model SE241 mounted on starboard aft engineroom bulkhead. Serial # not visible.

FINDING: The engineroom Halon fire extinguisher is out of date. Halon units must be checked and tagged annually.

RECOMMENDATION: Federal requirements for portable fire extinguishers are very minimal with no set inspection periods except pressure gauge checks. ABYC and NFPA recommended standards call for ABC rated units in each separate compartment of boat and annual checks by a licensed agency. Cylinders should be pressure tested every six years and units refilled (new extinguishers are usually cheaper) with new extinguishing agent. Note also that all extinguishers must be kept in an approved bracket in a readily accessible and visible location. All units currently on boat are out of date for
inspection. Recommend replacement and mounting as necessary to comply with regulations. One additional unit is recommended for either aft cockpit or
upper bridge mounting. ABYC and NFPA standards recommend an A-B-C rated extinguisher in each living or sleeping compartment.

One KIDDE Type I 2# 11OZ ABC extinguisher, mounted on aft navigation station bulkhead. Gauge in green. Serial # SS355360

NOTE: It is a good idea to have a fire extinguisher at the helm position. Also highly recommend an extinguisher be kept near the master berth.

First Aid Kit:

Minimal components sighted aboard at time of survey. Drawer, starboard side of head.

Life Raft:

AVON valise mounted on cabin rooftop. Serial # 39467

FINDING: Life raft last serviced 3/21/2007

RECOMMENDATION: Have unit serviced by certified life raft re-packers.

Other:

Floating MOB distress pole, sighted mounted on after stay. MOB light sighted in lower cabinet, aft of navigation station.

Legal

Legal Documents:

FINDING: No current Documentation Certificate sighted aboard.

RECOMMENDATION: Obtain aboard the original copy of the Documentation Certificate. The original MUST be aboard at all times.

Oil pollution and MARPOL trash control regulatory placards mounted in engineroom space.

Dinghy Numbers:

FINDING: No Dinghy registration

RECOMMENDTION: LEGAL- Recommend registering the dinghy in the state of primary use.

46 CFR Sec. 173.13 Exemptions.

Where the Coast Guard issues numbers, the following classes of vessels are exempt, under Section 12303 of Title 46, United States Code, from the numbering provisions of Sections 12301 and 12302 of Title 46, United States Code, and this part:

(a) A vessel that is used exclusively for racing.

(b) A vessel equipped with propulsion machinery of less than 10 horsepower that:

(1) Is owned by the owner of a vessel for which a valid certificate of number has been issued;

(2) Displays the number of that numbered vessel followed by the suffix “1” in the manner prescribed in Sec. 173.27; and

(3) Is used as a tender for direct transportation between that vessel and the shore and for no other purpose.

NOTE: The proper marking to paint on the dinghy is “No. 565392-1” Do NOT paint the vessel name on the dinghy. When it is at a pier, it will alert people that you are away from your boat.

Other:

Sighted PANAMA CANAL Admeasurement No. 251593

& Amenities

Quarters/Berths:

Forepeak has a double berth offset to port. Storage under. Locker, small shelf, and drawers to starboard. Overhead is white padded vinyl. And ceilings (walls) are covered in varnished teak strips.

In the salon to port, the dinette table converts to a double bunk. To starboard the upper outer shelf converts to a single bunk, and the bench seat inboard also converts to a single. Lee cloths fitted. Thus, 6 persons could bunk comfortably for short duration voyages. Two bulkhead mounted brass kerosene lamps.

12VDC lamps provide lighting, curtained, screened, portholes and hatches provide ventilation. Teak floors throughout.

Padded white vinyl on overhead. Good condition.

Galley:

“U” shaped galley to port aft of salon. Aft and outboard section of countertop covered in 1” white tile.

SHIPMATE Model 782-6 kerosene 2-burner w/ oven under. Approx 2 gallon kerosene tank in locker outboard. Did not test.

Aft counter has one large and one small stainless sink. Small sink has cover.

FINDING: The drain on the large galley sink is not properly secured.

RECOMMENDATION: Obtain and install the proper fittings for the galley sink drain.

Cold water only. PUR water filter on tap.

Storage lockers behind and outboard.

Overhead is covered with sheet of stainless steel.

FINDING: The galley sole, extending outboard under the stove is covered with 1” white tiles. It appears that the wood underlayment is in an advanced state of decay and will need to be attended to.

RECOMMENDATION: Inspect the sole under the galley stove and determine the condition of the wood under the tile. Repair as necessary.

Heads & Showers:

Head is forward between salon and forepeak berth. Toilet and sink are to port. Stand up shower with overhead rail curtain is centerline in passageway. To starboard are storage lockers.

Single small round sink. Cold water service only.

Screened porthole, and dorade opening in overhead could provide adequate ventilation. [Cowl opening sealed, did not sight cowl fitting.].

Porthole and round deck prism lets in natural daylight. 12VDC fluorescent lamp for night.

FINDING: Noted mold inside the head cabinet on the forward bulkhead.
RECOMMENDATION: Clean with dish soap, and wear a breathing mask.

Ventilation:

With 10 screened opening portholes, forepeak deck hatch and companionway hatch, ventilation is considered adequate. Addition of 12VDC fans would improve air circulation.

FINDING: Noted none of the ventilation cowls had insect screening installed.

RECOMMENDATION: Fit all the ventilating cowls with insect screening.

Miscellaneous

Canvas & Covers:

20oz brown canvas foredeck cover, forward of the main mast. Fair condition.

Bimini of Blue Sunbrella covers main companionway, with cockpit cover stretched to boom crutch. Good condition.

Canvas handrail covers. Fair condition.

Matching blue canvas tiller cover.

Lazaretto hatch covered in blue canvas.

Other:

Bosun’s chair in starboard aft salon locker.

Tender

Description:

CARIBE ™ Model 2.7, inflatable with sectional plywood floors. Sighted in storage bag. Did not test inflate. Year not determined.

Motor:

7 HP ESKA  Model # 1707     Serial # 320350

Sighted on plywood mount secured to port taffrail.

Did not test for operation.

FIRST UNDERWAY TRIAL

Liberty. Travel time approximately 1-1/2 hours each way. Vessel operated by broker.

OBSERVATIONS:

Engine started without excessive cranking.

The engine exhaust had some white smoke until it warmed up.

Idle speed when warm approximately 600 RPM.

Engine reached 2650 at WOT on return trip, after cleaning barnacles from propeller.

Tachometer and engine water temperature gauges operated.

Alternator – 14.5VDC output.

Transmission operated normally.

Combination shifter/throttle operated normally.

Tiller operated normally. Walk to starboard in reverse.

No oil or water leaks noted.

FINDING: Excessive vibrations noted at idle speed.

RECOMMENDATION: Have a qualified marine diesel mechanic check the entire propulsion system, including the engine mounts.

SECOND UNDERWAY TRIAL

On 21 March 2010, the two buyers, the Broker, the Surveyor, and the Captain Mr. Ron Long, took the vessel to Lake Ponchartrain and back. Departing about 1430 and returning about 1830, the sails were lofted, and the running rigging inspected.

During preparations for getting underway the engine battery was dead, and the engine was run during the entire sea trial. Only at the end of the sea trial did the alternator, and tachometer gauge appear to function.

FINDING: The electrical system is in very poor condition.

RECOMMENDATION: As before, have a qualified marine electrician, inspect the entire system and recommend a plan for overhaul.


GENERAL CONDITION

Hull and Deck:

Good condition. Generally free of cracks, delamination, or other damage. Anti-skid surface in good condition.

Bottom:

Fair condition. Blisters under anti-fouling need attention.

Structural Integrity:

Apparently satisfactory.

Through-hulls & Underwater Plumbing:

Fair condition. Seacocks were in good condition but not operable.  Hoses were in good condition, but most clamps were in need of attention. Other fittings were in serviceable condition.

Machinery:

Fair condition. Machinery is clean and painted, with only minimal surface corrosion and rust.  Tiller steering is serviceable.

Tankage and Piping:

 

Fair condition. Hoses were in good condition, but most clamps were in need of attention.

Electrical:

 

Very poor condition.

NAV & Electronics:

 

Fair condition, when possible to test.

Safety:

 

Poor condition. Mandated safety items missing. Life raft out of service date. Engineroom fire suppression system out of service date. No flares, bell, CO detectors, etc.

Accommodations:

Good condition. Interior appointments in normal condition for age. Housekeeping fair.

OVERALL:

Fair condition.


RECOMMENDATIONS

(Further details, additional exceptions, deficiencies, and maintenance suggestions are found

in NOTES section above.)

FINDINGS

RECOMMENDATIONS

Some of the rudder shaft bushings are missing or partially missing.

During the next haulout, recommend unshipping the rudder and replacing all the bushing rings so as to start out with a new set.

The starboard chain locker access door top hinge is broken, and the inside of the door is moldy.

Repair chain locker access doors, and utilizing regular dish soap and water, wash down all surfaces to remove mold. Wear breathing mask.

The hull topsides external rubrails were generally in poor condition, with a large section amidships on the port side missing altogether.

Repair port and starboard hull topsides rubrails to match existing.

 

Noted several hundred 1-2” blisters, which appeared to be limited in depth to the paint coating.

 

At the next haulout opportunity strip the paint down to the laminate, prime, then fair, re-prime, and paint with anti-fouling material of choice.

The companionway starboard hatch slide is loose.

Refasten the companionway hatch slide, and refinish to match.

The spring retainer installed on the foredeck hatch cannot be considered safe as a “hold open” mechanism.

Install a commercially made hold open bar, or perhaps a swing leg of wood attached to the side of the hatch cover.

Noted past water damage to salon joinerwork forward port side.

 

Investigate further and determine if leak is still occurring, trace to source, and repair to best marine practice.

The all chain rode has begun to corrode.

Take out chain rode for careful inspection, and perhaps have it re-galvanized.

The anchor rode screw pin shackles are not properly moused.

 

Mousing; the placing of stainless wire in the pin and around the shank of the shackle, will stop the pin unscrewing when the anchor is deployed.

There are no proper chain stoppers installed. It is imperative to unload the windlass when the anchor is set, and secure the chain rode in some manner.

 

Either install proper chain stoppers on both anchors, or a couple of approaches may be implemented in designing a workable chain stopper system. A length of 5/8″ or ¾” three strand nylon should be bent on the cleat and the ‘S’ hook or similar fitting attached to the chain gripping end. Even better, would be a nylon bridle of  ¾” three strand nylon, made up with eyes in each end for placement on the port and starboard forward cleats, with a chain attachment fitting [a galvanized shackle for galvanized chain] in the middle of the bridle. It should be long enough for the middle of the bridle to reach the waterline.

 

The opening between the Sampson post and the deck is not sealed tight, and water has penetrated the deck. Resultant rot has occurred in the ½” plywood underlayment (in the overhead of the chain locker.

First, insert caulk where the Sampson posts penetrate the deck. Inspect the area further, and determine the extent of deterioration. One method of repair might be injection of a penetrating epoxy. Otherwise, have a qualified marine repair technician suggest other methods of repair.

The windlass starboard aft hold down bolt top nut is heavily corroded. There is no record aboard indicating when the last time the windlass bolts were drawn for inspection.

 

Draw all the windlass bolts for inspection and replace components as necessary prior to re-installing with proper bedding and sealants.

 

The starboard pinrail between the main shrouds is split longitudinally.

 

Replacement of the starboard shroud pinrail is the only option.

 

The port and starboard shroud mounted pin rails were affixed utilizing hose clamps. The tails of these clamps are a personnel safety hazard.

 

Find another method to affix the main mast shroud pin rails without utilizing pipe clamps.

 

Noted that the fenders were hung from the safety lines. This will soon compromise the stanchions and cause water leaks into the deck substrate, as well as prematurely wearing out the safety lines.

Only attach the inflatable fenders to the bases of a stanchion or other strong point.

 

The boom mounted middle reef line turning block is broken.

 

Replace the boom mounted middle reef line turning block.

 

The compression post is resting upon a collection of various blocks of undetermined material. Does not appear serviceable over the long term.

When the mast is next removed for service, include replacing the compression post base with a single block and a minimum of wedges.

 

The main mast spreaders do not have the correct upward tilt angle.

Have a competent rigger properly orient the main mast upper spreaders.

Many of the turnbuckle rigging screws are secured with split cotter pins. These are a danger to crew and running rigging.

Replace all split cotter pins with split ring fasteners.

 

The chainplates show evidence of corrosion staining at the lower ends. This may indicate deterioration of the fasteners.

Pull each and every chainplate fastener for close inspection. If any doubt exists replace with like kind and quality.

The main mast aft shroud chainplates have an unfair lead.

 

Obtain the services of a competent marine rigger and follow the guidance given to lessen the deleterious effects of the unfair chainplate leads.

The standing rigging is not correctly tuned, and the spreaders are not correctly oriented (too low).

Have a competent rigger service the entire rigging system.

 

Sighted wasted zinc anode at base of lower bobstay fitting. The STAYLOCK fitting is also corroded. The upper turnbuckle threaded ‘T’ fittings on both upper and lower bobstay have corrosion and cracks.

 

Replace bobstay anode with like kind and quality. Replace the lower bobstay STAYLOK fitting. Replace with new, the upper turnbuckle threaded ‘T’ fittings on both upper and lower bobstay

 

Sighted crack in port whisker stay front turnbuckle

Carefully inspect the whole system and replace any suspect components.

There is no available record of the age of the rigging system. In the tropics 10 years is the generally accepted life span.

Have a rigging specialist inspect the entire system and suggest and overhaul protocol. This is critical prior to venturing offshore.

The Staysail traveler car needs attention. It did not roll smoothly during tacking evolutions.

 

Remove the staysail traveler car and inspect the condition of the car and roller wheels. Repair or replace as necessary.

 

By appearance, the rubber engine mounts may be due for renewal. Also, when the engine was running in neutral, there was an abnormal amount of vibration.

Have a qualified engine mechanic carefully inspect the engine mounts for serviceability.

 

Antifreeze composition not correct.

 

Obtain correct antifreeze composition from engine manufacturers’ manual, and bring cooling system into compliance.

 

The antifreeze overflow bottle is simply an old plastic bottle. As well, it is not properly secured from misadventure, and should be installed on the same level as the main cooling water reservoir on the engine.

 

Investigate the cooling water overflow container assembly and bring into conformance with proper marine standards.

 

Main engine raw water suction seacock valve not easily operable.

 

At the earliest opportunity overhaul main engine cooling water suction seacock.

 

Many of the piping clamps on the overboard through hull fittings are beginning to show signs of corrosion.

Recommend inspecting EACH piping clamp by REMOVING the clamp, inspecting the gear and strap for corrosion, and replace if any corrosion is found.

ATF Transmission fluid very dark.

 

Recommend changing transmission fluids. Also check any pencil zinc anodes at the same time.

 

The clamps on the shaft log are showing signs of corrosion.

Replace all the clamps on the shaft log.

There were several main engine exhaust cooling water system piping hose clamps that were corroding and need replacement. Also there was a section of exhaust piping that should have some heat protection wrapping installed so no one gets burned.

Replace all the main engine exhaust cooling water system piping clamps.  Wrap all exposed metal portions of the exhaust system riser.

 

The hose clamps on the port fuel tank hose are corroded and need to be replaced. There are also several other fuel hose clamps that need replacement.

Check all hoses and clamps in the fuel system and replace any that are not like new.

 

The battery installations fail to meet any of the minimum requirements of ABYC E-10.7. Ungrounded terminals not protected by rubber boots. Corrosion on battery leads. Battery leads without proper fusing. Loose terminal wing nuts, loose batteries, etc. AND, the starting battery was found dead, and the house batteries were not in much better condition.

Have an ABYC qualified marine electrician inspect and upgrade the entire 12VDC battery installation.

 

At time of survey, installed instruments indicated side mounted solar panels were not operable.

Have a qualified marine electrician service the outboard solar panels and determine their condition. Repair as necessary.

The electrical system appears to be generally operable, but does not conform to any normal installation standards. Open faced terminal blocks, loose wiring, wire nuts, no labeling, and no grommets where wiring passes through bulkheads, minimal strapping, etc.

Have an ABYC qualified marine electrician conduct a thorough survey of the electrical system, and recommend repairs, upgrades, and improvements.

 

During survey and sea trial could not find any indication of output by the wind generator. Wind conditions were very light.

Have a qualified marine electrician conduct appropriate tests to determine the condition of the wind generator output parameters.

The zinc anode normally installed on the propeller shaft was missing.

As soon as is possible, install a zinc collar anode around the propeller shaft.

The anode on the lower bobstay is heavily wasted. Also there is corrosion on the wire end fitting.

Replace the entire lower bobstay fitting and the zinc anode on lower bobstay as soon as possible.

The MSD “Y” valve is stuck in the ‘overboard’ position. This would garner a hefty fine upon the occasion of a compliance boarding.

Repair or replace MSD “Y” valve prior to getting underway.

The galley foot pump did not operate.

 

Investigate further and repair or replace as necessary.

There is no current Ship Radio License posted. While not necessary for VHF use while inland voyaging, having a SSB radio aboard does require obtaining a ship and operators license.

Apply to the FCC for a Ship and Radio Operator License.

 

No record of the last time the pair of cockpit mounted compasses were swung. No deviation table available.

Have a competent mariner swing the compasses and develop a deviation table. This needs to be updated at least annually, or any time major work is conducted aboard.

SSB Radio not tested for operational parameters. No ships or operators licenses posted aboard.

Have a qualified licensed radio technician perform the required tests prior to use. Obtain the required operating licenses.

Port side aft, near the refrigerator raw water through hull fitting there are two holes in the hull filled with a RULE 5200 type material. This cannot be considered a seaworthy repair.

During hull paint stripping, and overhaul of seacocks, recommend proper repairs be conducted to the FRP hull structure.

 

The port cockpit drain hose has only one clamp on the upper end of the hose.

After determining if a second clamp could correctly fit on the fitting, install one there if possible to do so.

None of the seacocks have been operated for over two years. Both the head sink drain and the engine suction seacocks were so stiff as to be considered inoperable.

Overhaul ALL seacocks at the next haulout, by completely removing them, inspecting for corrosion, and lubricating all moveable parts.

 

Main engine raw water suction seacock valve was not operable.

Many of the pipe clamps on the overboard through hull fittings are beginning to show signs of corrosion.

 

Immediately service the main engine raw cooling water seacock.

Recommend inspecting EACH piping clamp by REMOVING the clamp, inspecting the gear and strap for corrosion, and replace if any corrosion is found.

RULE control panel for bilge pump, located at front side of navigation station did not operate. Also found a 20AMP fuse installed. This is a classic way to start a fire.

Inspect bilge pump system (aft most pump in bilge sump) and determine the problem. Repair or replace as necessary. ENSURE the correctly sized fuse is installed.

Did not sight a CO detector aboard.

Install marine carbon monoxide monitor/alarms (ABYC Std. A-24) alarms (NFPA 302) to protect all enclosed accommodations.

Did not sight any USCG required emergency signaling devices.

Obtain aboard a current set of USCG approved signaling flares.

Did not sight a bell.

 

Obtain a bell with a mouth opening of 200mm (over 8”). Also, it would be a prudent idea to install a bell mount on the forward portion of the vessel (or on the mast).

Steaming (Bow) Light did not operate.

Check the steaming lamp bulb and replace, or find wiring fault and repair to operational status.

The engineroom Halon fire extinguisher is out of date. Halon units must be checked and tagged annually.

 

Federal requirements for portable fire extinguishers are very minimal with no set inspection periods except pressure gauge checks. ABYC and NFPA recommended standards call for ABC rated units in each separate compartment of boat and annual checks by a licensed agency. Cylinders should be pressure tested every six years and units refilled (new extinguishers are usually cheaper) with new extinguishing agent. Note also that all extinguishers must be kept in an approved bracket in a readily accessible and visible location. All units currently on boat are out of date for inspection. Recommend replacement and mounting as necessary to comply with regulations. One additional unit is recommended for either aft cockpit or upper bridge mounting. ABYC and NFPA standards recommend an A-B-C rated extinguisher in each living or sleeping compartment.

Life raft last serviced 3/21/2007

Have unit serviced by certified life raft re-packers.

No current Documentation Certificate sighted aboard.

 

Obtain aboard the original copy of the Documentation Certificate. The original MUST be aboard at all times.

No Dinghy registration

Recommend registering the dinghy in the state of primary use.

 

The drain on the large galley sink is not properly secured.

Obtain and install the proper fittings for the galley sink drain.

The galley sole, extending outboard under the stove is covered with 1” white tiles. It appears that the wood underlayment is in an advanced state of decay and will need to be attended to.

Inspect the sole under the galley stove and determine the condition of the wood under the tile. Repair as necessary.

 

Noted mold inside the head cabinet on the forward bulkhead.

Clean with dish soap, and wear a breathing mask

Noted none of the ventilation cowls had insect screening installed.

Fit all the ventilating cowls with insect screening.

 

Excessive engine vibrations noted at idle speed.

 

Have a qualified marine diesel mechanic check the entire propulsion system, including the engine mounts.

The electrical system is in very poor condition.

 

As before, have a qualified marine electrician, inspect the entire system and recommend a plan for overhaul.

After the survey has been completed and the findings have been organized in a logical manner, it is the surveyor’s experience that develops an opinion of the OVERALL VESSEL RATING OF CONDITION. The grading of vessel conditions, developed by BUC RESEARCH, and generally accepted in the marine industry, determines the adjustment to the range of base values as found in the BUC USED BOAT PRICE GUIDE, for a similar vessel sold within a given time period, as one of the considerations in determining the Market Value.

The following is the generally accepted BUC marine grading system;

“EXCELLENT (BRISTOL) CONDITION”, is a vessel that is maintained in a mint or Bristol fashion. –     Usually better than factory new- loaded with extras – a rarity.

“ABOVE AVERAGE CONDITION”, is a vessel that has had above average care and is equipped with extra electrical and electronic gear.

“AVERAGE CONDITION”, is a vessel that is ready for sale requiring no additional work and normally equipped for her size.

“FAIR CONDITION”, is a vessel that requires usual maintenance to prepare for sale.

“POOR CONDITION”, is a vessel that needs substantial yard work and is devoid of extras.

“RESTORABLE CONDITION”, is a vessel that enough of hull and engine exists to restore boat to  useable condition.

Sundowner's serial number on side of hull
VALUATION

Estimated New Replacement Cost                                 Approximately $450.000.00
Estimated Current Market Value                                                     $30,000.00

This valuation is based on the vessel’s apparent condition on the date of survey and assumes that the vessel’s engine and other installed equipment not proven during the survey inspection are in fact operational.  Discoveries made as a consequence of recommended additional testing/inspection procedures may significantly lower this valuation. Valuations are developed using some or all of the following resources: commercially published used boat price guides and databases (BUC, Soldboats.com etc.), commonly accepted marine depreciation schedules, and consultations with knowledgeable boat brokers. Commercially published used boat price guides such as those noted above rely heavily on archived data. Recent market changes have not been fully incorporated into the above values. Therefore this surveyor has reduced the published amounts by 15% to more accurately reflect current market conditions.

I certify that to the best of my knowledge and belief: •The statements of fact in this report are true and correct.  •The reported analyses, opinions, and conclusions are limited only by the reported assumptions and limiting conditions and are my personal, impartial and unbiased professional analyses, opinions and conclusions.  •I have no present or prospective interest in the property that is the subject of this report and no personal interest with respect to the parties involved.  •I have no bias with respect to the property that is the subject of this report or to the parties involved with this assignment.  •My engagement in this assignment was not contingent upon developing or reporting predetermined results. •My compensation for completing this assignment was not contingent upon the development or reporting of a predetermined value or direction in value that favors the cause of the client, the amount of the value opinion, the attainment of a stipulated result, or the occurrence of a subsequent event directly related to the intended use of this appraisal.  •My analyses, opinions, and conclusions were developed and this report has been prepared in conformity with the UNIFORM STANDARDS OF PROFESSIONAL APPRAISAL PRACTICE using methods recognized by the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF APPRAISERS, leading to an educated, unbiased, and defensible opinion.  I have made a personal inspection of the property that is the subject of this report.  •No one provided significant personal property appraisal assistance to the person signing this report.

This vessel, as described herein, and subject to compliance with the foregoing recommendations, was found to be in satisfactory condition for its intended service. Prior to going into offshore waters (20nm + COLREGS line) several items of regulatory and safety gear must be obtained aboard.

REPORT SUBMITTED WITHOUT PREJUDICE

Kristoffer A. Diel

Kristoffer A. Diel, AMS® CMI®

Attending Surveyor

[Signature invalid without seal]

Attachments:

1.HIN Rubbing

2.Photocopy of Documentation / Registration                                               Date: 22 May 2010