Go to Part 1 of caulking the deck seams for more detailed instructions.

Please, please don't rain

I don’t usually ever plead or beg to the unknown for things that I want in life. I guess I feel life is just going to be whatever it is (and I make of it) and it would be pathetic and self serving to put hope in begging for things to go my way. This isn’t to say I’ve never done it. It’s funny but it is at those most desperate of times in my life when I’ve found myself actually begging, pleading for things to work out.

In those circumstances where I can physically do no more my last, very last resort is to beg. This weekend I found myself doing just that. Now boat projects don’t really fall in the “desperate” category for me but I worked so hard on Thursday and Friday to prepare the rest of the teak that I just really really really wanted it to not rain.

Starboard Teak before pics:
Starboard before
Starboard caulk before picture

All of the caulk removed using Teak Decking Systems Reefing Hook
Caulk removed

Oh yeah I made a short video of the tool in action. As far as I can tell there isn’t another manual tool like this out in the market. I swear this job would have taken at least 5 times as long without it.

Tackling the rest of the teak this go around I needed more time so I started early on Thursday night after work removing caulk and then again on Friday where I finished sanding/cleaning everything. Saturday was the day I was going to wake up early (6am) and tape as fast as I could and caulk the remainder of the cockpit. I needed to be done by 4pm so time was of the essence. Thanks to VERY flaky weather the forecasts were changing by the hour. On Thursday Saturday’s forecast was 20% rain but by Saturday morning it was 60% starting at 1pm. UGH. Oh well, I’ll give it a shot, maybe it’ll work out.

I taped faster this time by leaving out the tabs. I found using a small screwdriver I could easily remove the tape.
Starboard Taped up

Clouds were passing overhead and by this point I was so far invested I resorted to pleading. Please, Please don’t rain. Come on, help me out! Please, I never ask for anything and so forth. LOL. This time around I caulked the battens first and then came back and did the long borders. I found this to disturb the caulk less.
Caulking and Taping
Middle caulked

The weather gods had mercy on me and held off the rain just until the moment I had closed up the last seam.  My makeshift rain protection in the first picture kept all of the caulk dry except this little section. The little drizzle doesn’t hurt the caulk at all though.
Rain on the middle caulk

I removed all the tape and found I had better caulk seams overall.
Caulk lines

Of course there were still the imperfections at the junctions but these will sand out easily as shown in the second picture.
Caulking Mistakes

Imperfection sanded out on the Port side (Part 1) with no problem.
Port side after sanding

And just like that I was done! As I sit here and type this I can hardly believe it.
Before:
Middle before

After
Middle finished
Starboard side finished

I actually sanded the previously completed port side (left) with 120 grit like TDS recommends and got out all the imperfections as well as toned down the black color a bit. If you have a discerning eye you can see the starboard side seams are blacker.
Cockpit completely finished

This second round of caulking took me 18 hours since it was more area, so in all about 33 hours to reseam the cockpit teak working by myself. Not bad and I would do it again in a heart beat. Everything looks brighter and more defined, it’s lovely. It’s sort of like how sweeping and mopping your floors at home makes all the difference. I Can’t wait for sundowners in Sundowner’s new cockpit.

Well truly that was my last big project on Sundowner (for now) and I can finally fall back into the Captain’s Apprentice role for the multitude of projects Tate has coming up! (Install the windvane, solar panels, propane and stove, water tanks and plumbing, anchors and chain, engine shifter) It’s hard for me to believe just how far we’ve come.