We hit the boat last night for about an hour to slip a few things in.  It started with me revisiting the raw water intake seacock which I had remembered had a barnacle growing in it.  I had a nightmare about it getting caught in the heat exchanger so I the first thing I did at the boat was get back into that thruhull.  When I looked in it with my flashlight though I couldn’t see a barnacle.  Instead eight eyes stared back at me!

We had a stowaway!  I had to fish it out.
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Dani was yelling at me not to kill the eight legged squatter.  I did my best but in the end I could not get it out of its home.  So I knocked the barnacle and other crap off with the wooden dowel and sucked it all out into the shop vac which was emptied after.  Hopefully the little guy is now happily squatting in a garbage can.

On to the shifter…

Do you ever get that sinking feeling while you’re doing something that you’re going to have to do it again?

I have to say that I got that feeling yesterday when we went to hook up the shifter cable to the engine.  It isn’t that I did it wrong; its that the shifter is old and should probably be replaced soon.  It won’t shift smoothly anymore despite my best efforts with oil and lubricants.  But the budget is stretched too thin for a new one at the moment, so perhaps in a couple of years we’ll redo this job.
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The shifter-transmission linkage was first.  It is an important part of any boat.  From a single shifter will be two lines.  You move the shifter and the one that moves first is the transmission cable.  I had to dry fit it first then adjust the end of it. 
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To adjust it I put the transmission in neutral along with the shifter.  I put the cable up to it and worked it out how far up or down I’d have to move the end.  The end is screwed on.  Its a metal barrel with a hole in it that fits over a bulb on the transmission.  It has a spring loaded sheath that snaps down to lock the two together.  Then a lock nut behind that.

After slipping it through the bracket and hooking it on this is what it looks like.
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I shifted it into forward and reverse a few times to see if it would pull the transmission lever the full range of motion.  I was a little concerned because it doesn’t quite make the full range of the lever.  However it is definately engaging in forward/reverse and then making it back into neutral.  I tested this by rotating the prop shaft.  In forward it will only turn one way, reverse the other, and in neutral it will spin in both directions.

The throttle cable is almost exactly the same drill except that it only pulls in one direction.  So its a bit easier to do.  You just make sure it starts at idle and pulls the throttle lever all the way.
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I tightened everything down pretty good and spent 10 minutes shifting the shifter back and forth and observing the results.  Looks good.  Fingers crossed.

I also installed the air filter again.  I had taken it off in the install and decided to leave it off until I got the throttle on since it was easier to get to that way.  Notice the intake is turned down.  Several people told me to make sure its opening faced downwards.  I can only assume this is so it never sucks in water or debris from above.  I can only speculate but figured I’d pass that on here.  Anyone know why?
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As a side note, our old tarp bit the dust finally.   We put a new one over the cockpit in the waning sunlight.
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I swear everyone in the boat yard must think we’re like the ghetto boat at this point.  We’re surrounded by expensive motor cruisers.   Our bottom is the pox right now.  We have make shift rigged tarps and lines everywhere.  Oh and the giant pile of trash beside the boat that we don’t throw away yet since we may have something we can scavenge if needed.  Its pretty funny.

Will be worth it in the end though.

Once it cools down, we’ll go back out to the boat and start working on sanding, cutting, and cleaning up the area for the new engine control panel.